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Polish Army, 1939
Lieutenant of Infantry

The field cap- which bore no insignia apart from the eagle- and the greatcoat were basically similar for all ranks. Officers wore rank stars on the shoulder straps; and all infantry ranks wore stripe of yellow above blue diagonally across the coat collar points. Officers generally retained breeches and top-boots for field dress, the latter spurred for officers entitled to a horse, and of fine quality. The officer’s belt isof Sam Browne type; other shoulder belts support the map case and binoculars on the left, and the holster for the ViS pistol on the right. The linen WSR gas mask pouch is slung behind the right hip on a fabric strap.

Privates of Infantry

Standard infantry dress and equipment are shown from front and rear. The helmet is the M1931 Polish type, finished with olive drab ‘Salamander’ paint in which was mixed tiny grains of cork to give a rough texture. Infantry formations had priority issue, although by 1939 some artillery and other arms and services had also received their allocation. The winter-issue M1936 wool uniform had straight trousers for the infantry, with these short ankle-puttees and the laced M1934 boot (sometimes seen un-blackened in 1939). The canvas M1932 knapsack bore a mess tin in olive drab (or dull aluminum) on the flap; the tent section or blanket was often wrapped round the greatcoat, which was strapped to the knapsack horseshoe-fashion. The entrenching tool and Mauser-style bayonet were carried ahead of the M1933 canvas breadbag on the left hip; the similar pouch for the WSR gas mask was slung on the right hip, to balance the breadbag. Mauser pouches are worn on the belt; note that the knapsack suspenders take the place of the Y-straps worn by the cavalry. The standard weapon was the Polish-made Mauser rifle, of which three principal versions were in service in 1939: the M1898 rifle, comparable to the German K98a; the M1898 carbine; and the M1929 carbine, comparable to the German K98k. The infantry collar patches, in blue with a yellow-piped scalloped rear edge and white zig-zag edging, would not have been worn in combat.

(Richard Hook and Steven Zaloga)

Polish Army, 1939

Lieutenant of Infantry

The field cap- which bore no insignia apart from the eagle- and the greatcoat were basically similar for all ranks. Officers wore rank stars on the shoulder straps; and all infantry ranks wore stripe of yellow above blue diagonally across the coat collar points. Officers generally retained breeches and top-boots for field dress, the latter spurred for officers entitled to a horse, and of fine quality. The officer’s belt isof Sam Browne type; other shoulder belts support the map case and binoculars on the left, and the holster for the ViS pistol on the right. The linen WSR gas mask pouch is slung behind the right hip on a fabric strap.

Privates of Infantry

Standard infantry dress and equipment are shown from front and rear. The helmet is the M1931 Polish type, finished with olive drab ‘Salamander’ paint in which was mixed tiny grains of cork to give a rough texture. Infantry formations had priority issue, although by 1939 some artillery and other arms and services had also received their allocation. The winter-issue M1936 wool uniform had straight trousers for the infantry, with these short ankle-puttees and the laced M1934 boot (sometimes seen un-blackened in 1939). The canvas M1932 knapsack bore a mess tin in olive drab (or dull aluminum) on the flap; the tent section or blanket was often wrapped round the greatcoat, which was strapped to the knapsack horseshoe-fashion. The entrenching tool and Mauser-style bayonet were carried ahead of the M1933 canvas breadbag on the left hip; the similar pouch for the WSR gas mask was slung on the right hip, to balance the breadbag. Mauser pouches are worn on the belt; note that the knapsack suspenders take the place of the Y-straps worn by the cavalry. The standard weapon was the Polish-made Mauser rifle, of which three principal versions were in service in 1939: the M1898 rifle, comparable to the German K98a; the M1898 carbine; and the M1929 carbine, comparable to the German K98k. The infantry collar patches, in blue with a yellow-piped scalloped rear edge and white zig-zag edging, would not have been worn in combat.

(Richard Hook and Steven Zaloga)



Polish Army, 1939

Lieutenant of Infantry

The field cap- which bore no insignia apart from the eagle- and the greatcoat were basically similar for all ranks. Officers wore rank stars on the shoulder straps; and all infantry ranks wore stripe of yellow above blue diagonally across the coat collar points. Officers generally retained breeches and top-boots for field dress, the latter spurred for officers entitled to a horse, and of fine quality. The officer’s belt isof Sam Browne type; other shoulder belts support the map case and binoculars on the left, and the holster for the ViS pistol on the right. The linen WSR gas mask pouch is slung behind the right hip on a fabric strap.

Privates of Infantry

Standard infantry dress and equipment are shown from front and rear. The helmet is the M1931 Polish type, finished with olive drab ‘Salamander’ paint in which was mixed tiny grains of cork to give a rough texture. Infantry formations had priority issue, although by 1939 some artillery and other arms and services had also received their allocation. The winter-issue M1936 wool uniform had straight trousers for the infantry, with these short ankle-puttees and the laced M1934 boot (sometimes seen un-blackened in 1939). The canvas M1932 knapsack bore a mess tin in olive drab (or dull aluminum) on the flap; the tent section or blanket was often wrapped round the greatcoat, which was strapped to the knapsack horseshoe-fashion. The entrenching tool and Mauser-style bayonet were carried ahead of the M1933 canvas breadbag on the left hip; the similar pouch for the WSR gas mask was slung on the right hip, to balance the breadbag. Mauser pouches are worn on the belt; note that the knapsack suspenders take the place of the Y-straps worn by the cavalry. The standard weapon was the Polish-made Mauser rifle, of which three principal versions were in service in 1939: the M1898 rifle, comparable to the German K98a; the M1898 carbine; and the M1929 carbine, comparable to the German K98k. The infantry collar patches, in blue with a yellow-piped scalloped rear edge and white zig-zag edging, would not have been worn in combat.

(Richard Hook and Steven Zaloga)


   
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