Follow @HistoryByZhukov You are visitor

Georgy Konstantinovich Zhukov's History Emporium

The Tuskegee Airmen

Under domestic pressure to expand the available roles for African-Americans in military service, the US Army established a new unit, the 99th Pursuit Squadron, for the training of African-Americans for flying duties. However, they - and the later 332nd Fighter Group and 477th Medium Bombardment Group - would forever be better remembered as the Tuskegee Airmen, after Tuskegee, Alabama where their training was conducted.

In the segregated US military of the time, the black fliers were forced to prove themselves constantly, and numerous officers in the Army were openly contemptuous of the project, hoping to see it fail. Despite such institutional barriers, the Tuskegee Airmen continually exceeded expectations, and justifiably earned a name for themselves as one of the best fighter groups in the US Army Air Force during World War II.

During their time in the war, the 332nd (the 477th was not deployed, still in training when the war ended) found themselves fighting in North Africa, and then Italy. The first squadron deployed, the 99th PS was armed with the P-40 Warhawk (top left), and later squadrons deployed with the P-39 Airacobra (top right) and P-47 Lightning (bottom left). But it was the P-51 which would be the mount of most of the Tuskegee Airmen once they began to be equipped with them in mid-1944, and the plane they are most associated with. Beginning with the issuance of the P-47s onwards, the Fighter Group painted their aircraft with the distinctive red job, giving them the nickname of “Red Tails”.

With the end of World War II, operations at Tuskegee Army Air Field continued, but with Executive Order 9981, signed by President Truman in 1948, the US military was to be integrated. The newly separate US Air Force was the first branch to fully integrate, in no small part due to the high quality pilots of the Tuskegee Airmen, and specifically the work of their commander, then Lt. Col. Davis, Jr., who assisted in drafting the plan for Air Force integration. 

(Art by Jim Laurier; Photo from the Tuskegee Airmen Museum)



The Tuskegee Airmen

Under domestic pressure to expand the available roles for African-Americans in military service, the US Army established a new unit, the 99th Pursuit Squadron, for the training of African-Americans for flying duties. However, they - and the later 332nd Fighter Group and 477th Medium Bombardment Group - would forever be better remembered as the Tuskegee Airmen, after Tuskegee, Alabama where their training was conducted.

In the segregated US military of the time, the black fliers were forced to prove themselves constantly, and numerous officers in the Army were openly contemptuous of the project, hoping to see it fail. Despite such institutional barriers, the Tuskegee Airmen continually exceeded expectations, and justifiably earned a name for themselves as one of the best fighter groups in the US Army Air Force during World War II.

During their time in the war, the 332nd (the 477th was not deployed, still in training when the war ended) found themselves fighting in North Africa, and then Italy. The first squadron deployed, the 99th PS was armed with the P-40 Warhawk (top left), and later squadrons deployed with the P-39 Airacobra (top right) and P-47 Lightning (bottom left). But it was the P-51 which would be the mount of most of the Tuskegee Airmen once they began to be equipped with them in mid-1944, and the plane they are most associated with. Beginning with the issuance of the P-47s onwards, the Fighter Group painted their aircraft with the distinctive red job, giving them the nickname of “Red Tails”.

With the end of World War II, operations at Tuskegee Army Air Field continued, but with Executive Order 9981, signed by President Truman in 1948, the US military was to be integrated. The newly separate US Air Force was the first branch to fully integrate, in no small part due to the high quality pilots of the Tuskegee Airmen, and specifically the work of their commander, then Lt. Col. Davis, Jr., who assisted in drafting the plan for Air Force integration. 

(Art by Jim Laurier; Photo from the Tuskegee Airmen Museum)


   
<−−−−− Previous Post • Sunday, February 09, 2014 • 19:02 • Next Post −−−−−>

267 notes

  1. frontlinefugitive reblogged this from xaedificare
  2. xaedificare reblogged this from georgy-konstantinovich-zhukov
  3. hoola121 reblogged this from intermodal
  4. flight-jk27 reblogged this from intermodal
  5. intermodal reblogged this from nudityandnerdery
  6. asad2abelo reblogged this from georgy-konstantinovich-zhukov
  7. luvslc reblogged this from 31262
  8. erickdisgrafstuff reblogged this from georgy-konstantinovich-zhukov and added:
    Simón Bolívar
  9. coyotestuck reblogged this from dendroica
  10. the-blood-of-history reblogged this from invictascientia
  11. invictascientia reblogged this from georgy-konstantinovich-zhukov
  12. thedustatdawn reblogged this from viewparadise
  13. sashimigrade reblogged this from nudityandnerdery
  14. catseamus reblogged this from nudityandnerdery and added:
    When I deployed to Iraq, the wing I was in was their wing. The same one.
  15. catastrophic-misanthropic reblogged this from georgy-konstantinovich-zhukov
  16. handsofham reblogged this from nudityandnerdery and added:
    I’m always pleased to see the Tuskegee Airmen get the attention they so richly deserve. Just wanted to point out that...
  17. iluvwomen15 reblogged this from steelbooger
  18. steelbooger reblogged this from dirtyasianbidness
  19. darrenlive reblogged this from dirtyasianbidness
  20. dirtyasianbidness reblogged this from stigmartyr762
  21. dungeonslayer reblogged this from nudityandnerdery
  22. socraticjedi reblogged this from nudityandnerdery
  23. psychoticpenguinpuppet reblogged this from nudityandnerdery
  24. othello33 reblogged this from nudityandnerdery
Thanks for coming to my 'Ask" page! Please feel free to ask anything tangentially related to the theme of this blog! If you want to ask questions about me, the person behind the blog though, please direct those questions to my personal blog, Zhora Zhukov. Thanks!