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Russian Staff Officers, World War One
Captain of the General Staff, A. Afanasyev

The typical officer’s uniform of the later war. The tunic was known as the ‘French’; his breeches and boots are standard patterns. Note that the shoulder boards are now of unstiffened material, and are sewn into the tunic seams to make them less prominent. Staff aiguillettes were either white or khaki. He Is decorated with the Order of St. Anne 2nd Class with Swords, the Order of St. Stanislaus 2nd Class with Swords, and the Order of St. Vladimir 4th Class with Swords, and wears on his right breast pocket the badge of the Nikolaevski Military Academy: he also carries a gilded St. George’s Sword ‘for Bravery’. All these figures wear the more elaborate officers’ version of the cap cockade, of domed construction with the rayed edge making a crenellated effect.

General of Artillery, V. lrmanov

This illustrates the officers’ greatcoat, in this case with the scartet lapels and cuff piping which distinguished general officers; his rank is also shown by his shoulder boards, in the zig-zag patterned lace of general officers. The black and red details on the service cap and collar patches indicate the arm of service. He wears the Order of St. George 3rd Class and the ribbon of the 4th Class. Hidden here by the coat, his breeches would have scarlet stripes - lampasi. General lrmanov commanded Ill Caucasian Corps in 1914. Following the March, 1917 Revolution he resigned his commission and re-enlisted as a private soldier.

Adjudant General of Cavalry, A.A. Brusilov

Russia’s most effective general of the war wears a plain, regulation officer’s service uniform with staff aiguillettes, the general officer’s trouser stripes being the only concession to color. He displays the Order of St. George 3rd and 4th Class, and the badge of the Corps of Pages, and carries a gilded St. George’s Sword for Bravery.

Colonel, medical service

The doctor is wearing the Bekesha which was a popular alternative to the usual greatcoat; this was a long version of the fleece-lined polushubok. His earmuffs are privately purchased. All members of the medical services wore the red cross brassard on the left arm.

(Andrei Karachtchouk)

Russian Staff Officers, World War One

Captain of the General Staff, A. Afanasyev

The typical officer’s uniform of the later war. The tunic was known as the ‘French’; his breeches and boots are standard patterns. Note that the shoulder boards are now of unstiffened material, and are sewn into the tunic seams to make them less prominent. Staff aiguillettes were either white or khaki. He Is decorated with the Order of St. Anne 2nd Class with Swords, the Order of St. Stanislaus 2nd Class with Swords, and the Order of St. Vladimir 4th Class with Swords, and wears on his right breast pocket the badge of the Nikolaevski Military Academy: he also carries a gilded St. George’s Sword ‘for Bravery’. All these figures wear the more elaborate officers’ version of the cap cockade, of domed construction with the rayed edge making a crenellated effect.

General of Artillery, V. lrmanov

This illustrates the officers’ greatcoat, in this case with the scartet lapels and cuff piping which distinguished general officers; his rank is also shown by his shoulder boards, in the zig-zag patterned lace of general officers. The black and red details on the service cap and collar patches indicate the arm of service. He wears the Order of St. George 3rd Class and the ribbon of the 4th Class. Hidden here by the coat, his breeches would have scarlet stripes - lampasi. General lrmanov commanded Ill Caucasian Corps in 1914. Following the March, 1917 Revolution he resigned his commission and re-enlisted as a private soldier.

Adjudant General of Cavalry, A.A. Brusilov

Russia’s most effective general of the war wears a plain, regulation officer’s service uniform with staff aiguillettes, the general officer’s trouser stripes being the only concession to color. He displays the Order of St. George 3rd and 4th Class, and the badge of the Corps of Pages, and carries a gilded St. George’s Sword for Bravery.

Colonel, medical service

The doctor is wearing the Bekesha which was a popular alternative to the usual greatcoat; this was a long version of the fleece-lined polushubok. His earmuffs are privately purchased. All members of the medical services wore the red cross brassard on the left arm.

(Andrei Karachtchouk)



Russian Staff Officers, World War One

Captain of the General Staff, A. Afanasyev

The typical officer’s uniform of the later war. The tunic was known as the ‘French’; his breeches and boots are standard patterns. Note that the shoulder boards are now of unstiffened material, and are sewn into the tunic seams to make them less prominent. Staff aiguillettes were either white or khaki. He Is decorated with the Order of St. Anne 2nd Class with Swords, the Order of St. Stanislaus 2nd Class with Swords, and the Order of St. Vladimir 4th Class with Swords, and wears on his right breast pocket the badge of the Nikolaevski Military Academy: he also carries a gilded St. George’s Sword ‘for Bravery’. All these figures wear the more elaborate officers’ version of the cap cockade, of domed construction with the rayed edge making a crenellated effect.

General of Artillery, V. lrmanov

This illustrates the officers’ greatcoat, in this case with the scartet lapels and cuff piping which distinguished general officers; his rank is also shown by his shoulder boards, in the zig-zag patterned lace of general officers. The black and red details on the service cap and collar patches indicate the arm of service. He wears the Order of St. George 3rd Class and the ribbon of the 4th Class. Hidden here by the coat, his breeches would have scarlet stripes - lampasi. General lrmanov commanded Ill Caucasian Corps in 1914. Following the March, 1917 Revolution he resigned his commission and re-enlisted as a private soldier.

Adjudant General of Cavalry, A.A. Brusilov

Russia’s most effective general of the war wears a plain, regulation officer’s service uniform with staff aiguillettes, the general officer’s trouser stripes being the only concession to color. He displays the Order of St. George 3rd and 4th Class, and the badge of the Corps of Pages, and carries a gilded St. George’s Sword for Bravery.

Colonel, medical service

The doctor is wearing the Bekesha which was a popular alternative to the usual greatcoat; this was a long version of the fleece-lined polushubok. His earmuffs are privately purchased. All members of the medical services wore the red cross brassard on the left arm.

(Andrei Karachtchouk)


   
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