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Imperial Russian Guard Cavalry, World War I
Volunteer, Her Majesty’s Life Guard Lancer Regiment

This class of short term volunteers provided many of the reserve officers called up at mobilization. The Romanovskipolushubok was a popular winter jacket of fleece-lined cloth; note the fancy ‘lancer plastron’ effect on the chest of this example. ‘Volunteer braid’, of twisted orange, white and black, edges the shoulder straps. These bear a typical regimental monogram - here that of the Dowager Empress Maria Fedorovna, the regiment’s Colonel-in-Chief, which was only worn by the Elite Squadron. By this stage of the war much of the Russian cavalry was out of the line waiting for a breakthrough, hence the blue breeches and lack of weapons.

Private, Semenovski Life Guard Infantry Regiment

In full summer service dress, this Guardsman typifies what the British military attache described as ‘the finest human animals in Europe’. On the cuff of his gymnastiorka can be seen the white lace identifying the 1st Guards Infantry Division, and on the chest and shoulder straps the blue lace of the division’s second regiment. The Guards were the only infantry to be issued knapsacks for wear on the back. The ends of his rolled greatcoat are tucked into his mess-tin, a common practice.

Staff Captain, Grodno Life Guard Hussar Regiment

The crimson hussar breeches were commonly seen at this early stage of the war. The boots are of the style worn by hussars throughout Europe, high-fronted and with a white metal rosette at the front. Note the whistle on his left shoulder brace. On the breast pockets he wears the badges of his regiment and the Officer’s Cavalry School.

Cossack, Ataman’s (Tsarevitch’s) Life Guard Cossack Regiment

Cossacks always wore their headgear in defiance of gravity, hence the rakish angle of the fleece cap. Longer hair, with a lovelock just visible, was also a token of the Cossack’s freebooting past. The final Cossack touch is the slinging of the rifle over the right shoulder, rather than the usual left. Note the great length of the cavalry coat, and the deep pointed cut of the cuff, front and back. White leather waist and sword belts show that this is a Guardsman. The M1910 lance has no pennon; these were not used in the field.

(Andrei Karachtchouk)

Imperial Russian Guard Cavalry, World War I

Volunteer, Her Majesty’s Life Guard Lancer Regiment

This class of short term volunteers provided many of the reserve officers called up at mobilization. The Romanovskipolushubok was a popular winter jacket of fleece-lined cloth; note the fancy ‘lancer plastron’ effect on the chest of this example. ‘Volunteer braid’, of twisted orange, white and black, edges the shoulder straps. These bear a typical regimental monogram - here that of the Dowager Empress Maria Fedorovna, the regiment’s Colonel-in-Chief, which was only worn by the Elite Squadron. By this stage of the war much of the Russian cavalry was out of the line waiting for a breakthrough, hence the blue breeches and lack of weapons.

Private, Semenovski Life Guard Infantry Regiment

In full summer service dress, this Guardsman typifies what the British military attache described as ‘the finest human animals in Europe’. On the cuff of his gymnastiorka can be seen the white lace identifying the 1st Guards Infantry Division, and on the chest and shoulder straps the blue lace of the division’s second regiment. The Guards were the only infantry to be issued knapsacks for wear on the back. The ends of his rolled greatcoat are tucked into his mess-tin, a common practice.

Staff Captain, Grodno Life Guard Hussar Regiment

The crimson hussar breeches were commonly seen at this early stage of the war. The boots are of the style worn by hussars throughout Europe, high-fronted and with a white metal rosette at the front. Note the whistle on his left shoulder brace. On the breast pockets he wears the badges of his regiment and the Officer’s Cavalry School.

Cossack, Ataman’s (Tsarevitch’s) Life Guard Cossack Regiment

Cossacks always wore their headgear in defiance of gravity, hence the rakish angle of the fleece cap. Longer hair, with a lovelock just visible, was also a token of the Cossack’s freebooting past. The final Cossack touch is the slinging of the rifle over the right shoulder, rather than the usual left. Note the great length of the cavalry coat, and the deep pointed cut of the cuff, front and back. White leather waist and sword belts show that this is a Guardsman. The M1910 lance has no pennon; these were not used in the field.

(Andrei Karachtchouk)



Imperial Russian Guard Cavalry, World War I

Volunteer, Her Majesty’s Life Guard Lancer Regiment

This class of short term volunteers provided many of the reserve officers called up at mobilization. The Romanovskipolushubok was a popular winter jacket of fleece-lined cloth; note the fancy ‘lancer plastron’ effect on the chest of this example. ‘Volunteer braid’, of twisted orange, white and black, edges the shoulder straps. These bear a typical regimental monogram - here that of the Dowager Empress Maria Fedorovna, the regiment’s Colonel-in-Chief, which was only worn by the Elite Squadron. By this stage of the war much of the Russian cavalry was out of the line waiting for a breakthrough, hence the blue breeches and lack of weapons.

Private, Semenovski Life Guard Infantry Regiment

In full summer service dress, this Guardsman typifies what the British military attache described as ‘the finest human animals in Europe’. On the cuff of his gymnastiorka can be seen the white lace identifying the 1st Guards Infantry Division, and on the chest and shoulder straps the blue lace of the division’s second regiment. The Guards were the only infantry to be issued knapsacks for wear on the back. The ends of his rolled greatcoat are tucked into his mess-tin, a common practice.

Staff Captain, Grodno Life Guard Hussar Regiment

The crimson hussar breeches were commonly seen at this early stage of the war. The boots are of the style worn by hussars throughout Europe, high-fronted and with a white metal rosette at the front. Note the whistle on his left shoulder brace. On the breast pockets he wears the badges of his regiment and the Officer’s Cavalry School.

Cossack, Ataman’s (Tsarevitch’s) Life Guard Cossack Regiment

Cossacks always wore their headgear in defiance of gravity, hence the rakish angle of the fleece cap. Longer hair, with a lovelock just visible, was also a token of the Cossack’s freebooting past. The final Cossack touch is the slinging of the rifle over the right shoulder, rather than the usual left. Note the great length of the cavalry coat, and the deep pointed cut of the cuff, front and back. White leather waist and sword belts show that this is a Guardsman. The M1910 lance has no pennon; these were not used in the field.

(Andrei Karachtchouk)


   
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