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Georgy Konstantinovich Zhukov's History Emporium

Indian War Elephants of the Great Mughals

The time of the Great Mughals in India (1526-1858) saw a considerable change in the equipment of war elephants. Fighting towers become a thing of the past. People either rode an elephant, as in ancient India, or sat in a howdah. Howdahs were used by rulers and had two seats: the front, higher seat partitioned from the driver with a high vertical wall, and the back. lower one. The ruler occupied the first seat and his loyal aide-de-camp guard sat behind him.
The most valuable elephants were still protected with armour. Some elephants in Mughal miniatures are all clad in armor; others have only their heads and parts of the trunk protected; still others, even those in combat and carrying a ruler, are completely unprotected. No regularity is apparent from the sources. Probably some rulers considered elephant armor expedient, others did not. Elephant armor was made of plates and mail, as for example in the exhibit in the Royal Armories; scales sewn on a piece of cloth; brigandine, when steel plates were sewn in between layers of cloth; or just of quilted cloth or leather. The armor also had a peculiarity- protective ’ears’, two projections on the elephant's head to protect the driver.
The very tip of the trunk was left bare as it had to remain mobile to grab foes. Various kinds of weapons were sometimes fastened to the trunk - swords, scythes, maces and scraps of chain. Tusk swords were quite formidable weapons too.

(Peter Dennis)

Indian War Elephants of the Great Mughals

The time of the Great Mughals in India (1526-1858) saw a considerable change in the equipmenof war elephants. Fighting towers become a thing of the past. People either rode an elephantas in ancient India, or sat in a howdah. Howdahs were used by rulers and had two seats: the front, higher seat partitioned from the driver with a high vertical wall, and the back. lower one. The ruler occupied the first seat and his loyal aide-de-camp guard sat behind him.

The most valuable elephants were still protected with armour. Some elephants in Mughaminiatures are all clad in armor; others have only their heads and parts of the trunk protected; still others, even those in combat and carrying a ruler, are completely unprotected. No regularity is apparent from the sources. Probably some rulers considered elephant armor expedient, others did not. Elephant armor was made of plates and mail, as for example in the exhibit in the Royal Armories; scales sewn on a piece of cloth; brigandine, when steel plates were sewn in between layers of cloth; or just of quilted cloth or leather. The armor also had a peculiarity- protective ears’, two projections on the elephant's head to protect the driver.

The very tip of the trunk was left bare as it had to remain mobile to grab foes. Various kinds of weapons were sometimes fastened to the trunk - swords, scythes, maces and scraps of chainTusk swords were quite formidable weapons too.

(Peter Dennis)



Indian War Elephants of the Great Mughals

The time of the Great Mughals in India (1526-1858) saw a considerable change in the equipmenof war elephants. Fighting towers become a thing of the past. People either rode an elephantas in ancient India, or sat in a howdah. Howdahs were used by rulers and had two seats: the front, higher seat partitioned from the driver with a high vertical wall, and the back. lower one. The ruler occupied the first seat and his loyal aide-de-camp guard sat behind him.

The most valuable elephants were still protected with armour. Some elephants in Mughaminiatures are all clad in armor; others have only their heads and parts of the trunk protected; still others, even those in combat and carrying a ruler, are completely unprotected. No regularity is apparent from the sources. Probably some rulers considered elephant armor expedient, others did not. Elephant armor was made of plates and mail, as for example in the exhibit in the Royal Armories; scales sewn on a piece of cloth; brigandine, when steel plates were sewn in between layers of cloth; or just of quilted cloth or leather. The armor also had a peculiarity- protective ears’, two projections on the elephant's head to protect the driver.

The very tip of the trunk was left bare as it had to remain mobile to grab foes. Various kinds of weapons were sometimes fastened to the trunk - swords, scythes, maces and scraps of chainTusk swords were quite formidable weapons too.

(Peter Dennis)


   
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    Indian War Elephants of the Great Mughals The time of the Great Mughals in India (1526-1858) saw a considerable change...
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  6. lucretius2 reblogged this from georgy-konstantinovich-zhukov and added:
    Fuck that noise. Armored fucking elephants with flails and swords? No wonder lines broke.
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