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Members of the Afghan Mujaheddin.
(Steve McCurry)
French troops attempt a counter attack against Vietminh soldiers occupying foxholes on the outskirts of the French fortifications at Dien Bien Phu.


French troops attempt a counter attack against Vietminh soldiers occupying foxholes on the outskirts of the French fortifications at Dien Bien Phu.


German poster displaying the uniforms of some of their Entente Power opponents - Russia, Serbia, Montenegro, and Japan.
(IWM)


German poster displaying the uniforms of some of their Entente Power opponents - Russia, Serbia, Montenegro, and Japan.

(IWM)


"Company D, 61st New York Infantry, Falmouth, Va., April, 1863."
(LoC)


"Company D, 61st New York Infantry, Falmouth, Va., April, 1863."

(LoC)


“A soldier and his mother in a strawberry field near Florin, California, on May 11, 1942. The soldier, age 23, had volunteered for the Army on July 10, 1941, and was stationed at Camp Leonard Wood, Missouri. He was furloughed to help his mother and family prepare for their evacuation. He is the youngest of six children, two of them volunteers in the United States Army. The mother, age 53, came from Japan 37 years ago. Her husband died 21 years ago, leaving her to raise six children. She worked in a strawberry basket factory until last year when her children leased three acres of strawberries ‘so she wouldn’t have to work for somebody else’.”


A soldier and his mother in a strawberry field near Florin, California, on May 11, 1942. The soldier, age 23, had volunteered for the Army on July 10, 1941, and was stationed at Camp Leonard Wood, Missouri. He was furloughed to help his mother and family prepare for their evacuation. He is the youngest of six children, two of them volunteers in the United States Army. The mother, age 53, came from Japan 37 years ago. Her husband died 21 years ago, leaving her to raise six children. She worked in a strawberry basket factory until last year when her children leased three acres of strawberries ‘so she wouldn’t have to work for somebody else’.


Maderista General Ramón F. Iturbe and his “General Staff”. In Iturbe’s own words:

Here is a cute story. The town’s prettiest girls had taken refuge in the U.S. Consulate because the Federales had given me a bad reputation of carrying women off, and they were frightened. That was not true; I never carried a woman off, but for them Iturbe was a bandit. The consul presented me to them, and they noticed that I wasn’t like people said. We became friends, and four of them wanted to have a picture taken with me, holding arms. From that photo another legend was born: that Iturbe, rebel leader, had a feminine General Staff. The photo became famous in the capital, being published in magazines and newspapers.

(Fototeca Nacional del INAH)


Maderista General Ramón F. Iturbe and his “General Staff”. In Iturbe’s own words:

Here is a cute story. The town’s prettiest girls had taken refuge in the U.S. Consulate because the Federales had given me a bad reputation of carrying women off, and they were frightened. That was not true; I never carried a woman off, but for them Iturbe was a bandit. The consul presented me to them, and they noticed that I wasn’t like people said. We became friends, and four of them wanted to have a picture taken with me, holding arms. From that photo another legend was born: that Iturbe, rebel leader, had a feminine General Staff. The photo became famous in the capital, being published in magazines and newspapers.

(Fototeca Nacional del INAH)


“After the orders to relocate and detain persons of Japanese ancestry were rescinded, evacuees began returning home, and camps began to close. Here, Shuichi Yamamoto, the last evacuee to leave the Granada Relocation Center, in Amache, Colorado, says “Goodbye” to Project Director James G. Lindley, as the War Relocation Authority camp is officially closed October 15, 1945. Mr. Yamamoto, 65 years of age, was returning to his former home in Marysville, California.”
(National Archives)


After the orders to relocate and detain persons of Japanese ancestry were rescinded, evacuees began returning home, and camps began to close. Here, Shuichi Yamamoto, the last evacuee to leave the Granada Relocation Center, in Amache, Colorado, says “Goodbye” to Project Director James G. Lindley, as the War Relocation Authority camp is officially closed October 15, 1945. Mr. Yamamoto, 65 years of age, was returning to his former home in Marysville, California.”

(National Archives)


“German officers of Flieger Abteilung 280 have a party at a house where they are stationed near the Western Front, in the summer of 1918.”
(Reuters)


German officers of Flieger Abteilung 280 have a party at a house where they are stationed near the Western Front, in the summer of 1918.”

(Reuters)


“U.S. troops from the 160th Infantry Regiment are seen as they disembark from a landing craft during amphibious training on Guadalcanal, Solomon Islands, in March of 1944.”
(AP)


U.S. troops from the 160th Infantry Regiment are seen as they disembark from a landing craft during amphibious training on Guadalcanal, Solomon Islands, in March of 1944.”

(AP)


“On a brick wall beside an air raid shelter poster, exclusion orders were posted at First and Front Streets in San Francisco, California, directing the removal of persons of Japanese ancestry from the first part of San Francisco to be affected by the evacuation. The order was issued April 1, 1942, by Lieutenant General J.L. DeWitt, and directed evacuation from this section by noon on April 7, 1942.”
(National Archives)


On a brick wall beside an air raid shelter poster, exclusion orders were posted at First and Front Streets in San Francisco, California, directing the removal of persons of Japanese ancestry from the first part of San Francisco to be affected by the evacuation. The order was issued April 1, 1942, by Lieutenant General J.L. DeWitt, and directed evacuation from this section by noon on April 7, 1942.”

(National Archives)


scarabattoli said: First of all, thank you for the blog. Now the question: did the standard German helmet changed from WWI to WWII?

Thanks! And yes it did. Although the design that began with M1916 Stahlhelm formed the basis of German military headgear through the end of World War II, it went through some revisions by that time, with the M1935/M1940 being what most people think of. I’ve covered it a bit more in depth here.

German soldiers on the Western Front, c. 1918
(Hoffschmidt and Tantum Collection)


German soldiers on the Western Front, c. 1918

(Hoffschmidt and Tantum Collection)




The 10th Veteran Reserve Corps, in Washington, DC.

(LoC)


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